RESERVE A SUITE
RESERVE A SUITE
Palazzo Cecchini Lavaggi Guglielmi

The historic Renaissance Palace was owned by the Cecchini family, which boasted numerous conservatives in the Campidoglio, as well as cardinals and men of arms, and later became the seat of the Benedictine Nuns of Campo Marzio, of several cardinals, including Gian Angelo Braschi, who later became Pope with the name of Pius VI and bought the Palace, filling it with an extraordinary collection of works of art. The pontiff then ceded the palace to his nephew Luigi, who’s lived there with his wife Costanza Falconieri until 1792, when he moved into the new Braschi palace. Vincenzo Monti also lived here, as secretary of Luigi Braschi, and wrote the ode "Al Signor di Montgolfier", the "Galeotto Manfredi" and several other tragedies. The building was completely renovated in 1830 by the architect Antonio Sarti for the Counts Lavaggi, coming from Sicily, later created Marquises by Gregorio XVI: it was during this period that Domenico Lavaggi had a plaque affixed to the stairs to commemorate Pius VI's stay.

In the twentieth century the whole property passed to the Guglielmi family, who still live there, even if a part of the building is used as offices. The building covers the block between Vicolo della Guardiola, via della Maddalena and via degli Uffici del Vicario: on the latter, it has a two-storey façade over the mezzanine enclosed in smooth ashlar, where a portal opens up surmounted by a balcony with balustrade. The nine windows are architraved on the first floor and framed on the second. The same façade is repeated on via della Maddalena. As crowning, there is a coffered cornice with heraldic emblems by the Cecchini: roses alternating with lilies. Until 1831, the courtyard was among those used as a crossing to access via degli Uffici del Vicario from via della Maddalena or vice versa.

The historic Renaissance Palace was owned by the Cecchini family, which boasted numerous conservatives in the Campidoglio, as well as cardinals and men of arms, and later became the seat of the Benedictine Nuns of Campo Marzio, of several cardinals, including Gian Angelo Braschi, who later became Pope with the name of Pius VI and bought the Palace, filling it with an extraordinary collection of works of art. The pontiff then ceded the palace to his nephew Luigi, who’s lived there with his wife Costanza Falconieri until 1792, when he moved into the new Braschi palace. Vincenzo Monti also lived here, as secretary of Luigi Braschi, and wrote the ode "Al Signor di Montgolfier", the "Galeotto Manfredi" and several other tragedies. The building was completely renovated in 1830 by the architect Antonio Sarti for the Counts Lavaggi, coming from Sicily, later created Marquises by Gregorio XVI: it was during this period that Domenico Lavaggi had a plaque affixed to the stairs to commemorate Pius VI's stay.
In the twentieth century the whole property passed to the Guglielmi family, who still live there, even if a part of the building is used as offices. The building covers the block between Vicolo della Guardiola, via della Maddalena and via degli Uffici del Vicario: on the latter, it has a two-storey façade over the mezzanine enclosed in smooth ashlar, where a portal opens up surmounted by a balcony with balustrade. The nine windows are architraved on the first floor and framed on the second. The same façade is repeated on via della Maddalena. As crowning, there is a coffered cornice with heraldic emblems by the Cecchini: roses alternating with lilies. Until 1831, the courtyard was among those used as a crossing to access via degli Uffici del Vicario from via della Maddalena or vice versa.